Brain-zapping implants that fight depression are inching closer to reality (-1/-2)

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MOOD CHANGER  Neural activity in certain areas of the brain (brightly colored strands show connections emanating from those regions) can be measured to decode mood.

O.G. Sani and M.M. Shanechi/Shanechi Lab

Like seismic sensors planted in quiet ground, hundreds of tiny electrodes rested in the outer layer of the 44-year-old woman’s brain. These sensors, each slightly larger than a sesame seed, had been implanted under her skull to listen for the first rumblings of epileptic seizures.

The electrodes gave researchers unprecedented access to the patient’s brain. With the woman’s permission, scientists at the University of California, San Francisco began using those electrodes to do more than listen; they kicked off tiny electrical earthquakes at different spots in her brain.

Most of the electrical pulses went completely unnoticed by the patient. But researchers finally got the effect they were hunting for by targeting the brain area just behind her eyes. Asked how she felt, the woman answered: “Calmer in my nerves.”

… To Read more, please click here

Virtual reality therapy has real-life benefits for some mental disorders (-1/36)

Top 10 things to know about the Day of the Dead (-1/-2)

Brain-zapping implants that fight depression are inching closer to reality (-1/36)

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Share Now
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  •  
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  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

MOOD CHANGER  Neural activity in certain areas of the brain (brightly colored strands show connections emanating from those regions) can be measured to decode mood.

O.G. Sani and M.M. Shanechi/Shanechi Lab

Like seismic sensors planted in quiet ground, hundreds of tiny electrodes rested in the outer layer of the 44-year-old woman’s brain. These sensors, each slightly larger than a sesame seed, had been implanted under her skull to listen for the first rumblings of epileptic seizures.

The electrodes gave researchers unprecedented access to the patient’s brain. With the woman’s permission, scientists at the University of California, San Francisco began using those electrodes to do more than listen; they kicked off tiny electrical earthquakes at different spots in her brain.

Most of the electrical pulses went completely unnoticed by the patient. But researchers finally got the effect they were hunting for by targeting the brain area just behind her eyes. Asked how she felt, the woman answered: “Calmer in my nerves.”

… To Read more, please click here

Virtual reality therapy has real-life benefits for some mental disorders (-1/36)

Top 10 things to know about the Day of the Dead (-1/-2)